Category Archives: Candidates for City Council

2011 Election Campaign, Answer to Question #3

Historically, South End residents have been 2 separate communities living in one neighbourhood.  Of course, there is a blurring of lines as many First nations folks do live off reserve and in the South End, and there are support services for them in the neighbourhood.  We have been working over the past few years to build and strengthen our relationship with SFN; it has made us aware of some of the challenges that they face.

And so we asked this question:

3.  How would you support our First Nations population in Nanaimo?

Candidates for Mayor

Dan Didio

did not reply to the survey

Roger McKinnon

did not reply to the survey

Jim Routledge

WOW – the best for last.  The easiest (thank goodness) to answer.   I seek a mandate from the people of Nanaimo to offer to help Chief White & the Snuneymuxw Band in any efforts they might want to make to improve access to Newcastle Island.   This is the biggest part of my election platform.  I want to do this more than anything, for Nanaimo, for our community, for all of us.  I want to get to know our First Nation community, to listen and understand.  I know that helping them get what they want, will be an important step in getting what I want too.

John Ruttan

The City of Nanaimo enjoys a close and sincere relationship with SFN and has developed a comprehensive Protocol Agreement to that end. We continue to work on several joint ventures dealing with land and water and I can tell you that we put great importance in their needs.

Candidates for Council

George Anderson

         I had the opportunity of working with the late chief Viola Wyse, and I believe that it is of the utmost importance that we support and promote the First Nanaimo populations in Nanaimo. This is the Snuneymuxw first Nations traditional territory and we need to make sure we include them as we move forward as a city.
Bill Bestwick
         Absolutely critical we treat our First Nations population with respect and support.  We need to ensure the First Nations population, their history and culture are preserved and acknowledged.  We need to communicate more effectively and more frequently to address local concerns and issues with all aspects of their needs including adequate fresh water supplies and sanitation.  We need to work with all other agencies including the Federal, Provincial, District and Liason offerings are real and genuine.  Listening to our neighbors, consulting and growing together through partnerships and relationship building is key.
Arlene Blundell
         In consultation with them and collaborating on ideas, I would like to see: a) a world class First Nations Art Gallery in Beban House after it closes as a Tourist Office, b) collaborating with the owner(s) of the Public Market at the Departure Bay ferry terminal to make that a mini-Granville island with a 200 seat theatre where continuous summer performances of local history could happen such as a musical on Emily Carr and a First Nations Pow-wow, c) public performances of storytelling in their own language, d) more involvement in our workforce, e) more opportunities for better integration between the First Nations and others.
Diane Brennan
         I would support the First Nations citizens in the region by establishing and maintaining relationships with FN organizations and community leaders.The City has a protocol agreement with the Snuneymuxw people signed several years ago. The agreement sets out ways and means to work together and a joint committee meets on a regular basis to discuss issues of mutual concern (short and long term). The agreement guides the city’s relationship with the Snuneymuxw. The City could begin discussions with Tillicum Lelum Friendship Centre as a first step towards establishing a relationship with urban aboriginal people.

Brunie Brunie

The first Nation are not part of Nanaimo’s voting boundary.  I’m not sure that’s a good thing.  I myself am a halfbreed.  My father was Haida,  my mother German .  My stepfather resented me until the end of his time.  I would support them in any way possible.

Gord Fuller
         As with most things communication & mutual respect are key. Through my work and community involvement I have gotten to know many people of First Nation heritage. I have also built relationships with a number of councilors and the chief of Snuneymuxw First Nation. As
one of the poorer of the first nations groups in BC the city of Nanaimo needs to support the Snuneymuxw people in their efforts of seeking redress from Provincial and Federal Governments. Nanaimo needs to continue to cement its relationships with the Snuneymuxw and work towards making this a better community for all.
Ted Greves
         As a Councillor, I would encourage staff to schedule more City Council meetings with the SFN Council and address issues that we are able to address at our level of government. This is a very difficult issue with much of the support for the First Nations in the hands of the Federal and Provincial Governments.
Diana Johnstone
          I have enjoyed my role as a member of the Protocol Committee between SFN Council and Nanaimo City Council.  I have learned a great deal about our First Nation Culture and have a great respect for their absolute rights as a nation.  I would support them in a broad range of issues ranging from social development protection, enhancement of their unique culture, encouraging aboriginal tourism, and providing inclusiveness on city advisory or other committees.  I would be supportive in any way possible to enable them to move forward and leave the pain of the past behind.
Jim Kipp
         I have a long and excellent relationship with SFN and other First Nations personally, professionally and politically.  I take great pride in having been called on a number of occasions to be a witness for First Nations.

Gary Korpan

I was the Mayor who led the team who reconciled Nanaimo with our Snuneymuxw 1st Nations neighbours and partners. I am very proud of my excellent working relationship with Chiefs John Wesley and Viola Wyse. We signed the Community to Community Protocol Agreements and achieved solutions to many long standing problems. If elected, I intend to restore good relations with our Snuneymuxw friends.

Rodger Lomas
         The First Nation status – nation within a nation – is another enriching layer of the tapestry that makes up the greater Nanaimo social fabric & Canadian social network of persons from many nations. Notwithstanding special status afforded First Nations persons – all rights & privileges that other Canadians have are also bestowed upon our native population;enshrined in the Charter of rights & freedoms; the Human Rights Act and a person’s security further protected internationally by UN Convention.
However, it is well publicized that Native persons are over represented in our correctional system; why?
Additionally, a report by The Canadian Coalition for the Rights of Children released November 1st, 2011 titled: “Right in Principle Right in Practice” – it reports: Children and youth endure more violence, exploitation and abuse than adults. Twelve percent of children live in poverty, 13 percent live in unhealthy housing and 38 percent are food bank users. Furthermore, nearly 55 percent of children with disabilities do not have access to needed aids and equipment because of cost. It is not specified what percentage of children in this report are aboriginal; it does note that there is considerable evidence that aboriginal children are even worse off.
Furthermore, it sites examples of delayed health treatments for aboriginal children because of funding disputes between federal and provincial governments; and, evidence that there is discrimination against poor, disabled, aboriginal, refugee and immigrant children. Is this Canada? These are issues above any city councilor and much rests at the Provincial Government level and above; however, the existence ofsuch a state of our children disgusts me.
Nonetheless, as City Councillor I will strive to see positive change for all Children of the Community of Nanaimo. Indeed, the report provides a “blueprint” on how to turn this around – it needs councillors and other elected officials from all levels to champion it.
Our children are our immortality; our city (world) is their inheritance. Housing we are working on & making progress; and, part of my Nanaimo-
of-Tomorrow vision is a comprehensive Transportation plan that will give all persons of Nanaimo access to services, housing, and an exchange of Socio-economic opportunities throughout Nanaimo and beyond.

Zeni Maartman

Working with First Nations and asking how they would like us to support them. What is their vision for the City of Nanaimo and Snuneymuxw  First Nations. We need to have healthy conversations, around economic opportunities, treaty settlements, health and education and any issues that are of importance to First Nations themselves.  Municipal governments have a responsibility to work with senior governments to ensure all their citizens are respected and treated with dignity.

Jeet Manhas

I am proud to say that I have an excellent working relationship with our Snuneymuxw First Nations. During my two terms on City Council (2002-2008) I worked very hard to bring both the councils, City and Snuneymuxw First Nations, to an open table discussion and the outcome of that discussion was both the parties signing the Memorandum of Understanding. In the recent past I have also been working very closely with Snuneymuxw First Nations as a Director of Nanaimo Port Authority to build a Cruise ship Terminal.

Bill McKay
         I would like to know what I can do to help our First Nations community settle their treaties and land  claims.  We as a community have work to do, projects to start, and a bright future to start working towards.  We need to get going.  Council needs to provide a friendly and inviting environment to outside investment that will benefit all of our citizens including our First Nations community.

Darcy Olsen

I believe in working with all the community partners in Nanaimo and I look forward to continue to work with the Snuneymuxw First Nations on mutually beneficial projects.

Fred Pattje

To support our First Nations population to me means, first of all, that we must become much more aware of the challenges which our Snuneymuxw fellow citizens face on an almost daily basis. Once we have that understanding, we need to fully comprehend what the parameters for changing those challenges need to be. It is important to accept, for instance, that too many Snuneymuxw people live on too small a land base and will never be able to fulfill their economic aspirations unless that changes.

Equally important is that all of us take a trip to the library and learn about the Douglas Treaties, of which Chief Doug White lll speaks so eloquently and so often. Get to know this man better and see where he wants to lead his Nation  ( http://www.dougwhiteforchief.com/ )  I am glad to presently sit on a Council which has a relationship of mutual respect and understanding with SFN, a relationship which bodes well for our combined futures!

Trent Snikkers
         I have nothing but respect for the First Nations people, their art and culture, and their devotion to family and community.  I fully commit to having open and engaged discussions with Chief White and the Snuneymuxw Band to enhance (and protect) their interests and initiatives within our City.  Each Band is unique and I believe that the South End in particular can benefit greatly by incorporating the First Nations culture into development of its neighbourhood.
Rob Zver

I believe Council should work closely with the First Nations community in resolving their land treaty negotiations and assisting them in developing their lands so that they can build a substantial future for their people.  This kind of cooperation would ensure both success for the First Nations People and the City of Nanaimo as projects move forward many First Nations people would be provided job opportunities.  I also believe that City Council should enhance First Nations culture and art throughout the city so it can be showcased to the rest of the world.

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2011 Election Campaign: Answers to Question #2

A little framing first:   We in the South End are absolutely ecstatic about our shiny new neighbourhood plan.  Yes, it’s ambitious…over 100 action items.  Capable Chris Sholberg and his team led us through the planning process, which they made very clear and easy.  And we want to work with the city to help execute it.   But the process toward that isn’t so clear. So the question we asked was:

2.  The South End recently completed its Official Neighbourhood Plan.  How do you see Council’s role in supporting its implementation?

 

 

Candidates for Mayor

Dan Didio

did not reply to the survey

Roger McKinnon

did not reply to the survey

Jim Routledge

Wow – Good document – I was aware of it and of some of the general reasons for neighbourhood plans.  I reviewed this.  I don’t know how to exactly address your question.  I picked out a few things that jumped out at me.  I hope that tells you more about me and what my intentions might be with respect to the Plan.

Neighbourhood History

The Snuneymuxw, a Coast Salish people, have lived on the Nanaimo Harbour for thousands of years.

The South End’s industrial heritage is the city’s most significant. At the time of its closure in 1938, the No. 1 Mine, located at the foot of Milton Street, was the oldest operating coal mine in British Columbia. Over 18 million tons of coal had been removed from beneath Nanaimo’s Harbour. During its 55 years of operation, the mine was the city’s biggest employer.

5.4 Social Enrichment and Culture

Communication and Partnerships

12         Increased communication between the City, the neighbourhood, School District #68 and the Snuneymuxw First Nation for purposes of communication and partnership on servicing, security, community building, planning and arts / culture initiatives is encouraged.

5.5 Environmental Protection and Enhancement

Sustainable Building Technologies

8         Development of the Assembly Wharf / CP Lands as a model sustainable, green neighbourhood in a manner similar to Vancouver’s Southeast False Creek or Victoria’s Dockside Green is encouraged.

The 9 pages (approaching 100 items) of  Section 7.3 Implementation Strategy are specific & measurable.  They are designed to be tracked and reviewed.

I need guidance on this whole thing – it’s been a particularly good question.  I am from the other end of town, so forgive me if I take some time to get up to speed on all areas.   If elected Mayor, I will devote time to this and probably go along with what is clearly a well thought out and seasoned approach.  I see no reason now to do anything other that is for sure.  I support the OCP sincerely, this is part of that so I support it too.

The question that I feel obliged to ask is “How do you want me to see councils role with it?  Get more involved, stay away. How has it been going?

John Ruttan

I congratulate the South End for the successful completion of their “Official Community Plan”. I want to see the City of Nanaimo work collaboratively with the residents of the South End to assist them in meeting their goals. The City has great respect for those resident associations who see the need for change and are prepared to work with us on developing a strategy for success.

Candidates for Council

George Anderson

I believe that it is councils responsibility to work with south end to make sure the plan comes to realization. There needs to be open communication and transparency about the plan, and making sure that there is a timeline in order for it to be achieved.

Bill Bestwick

It is imperative Council continue to build relationship and support the SECA in advancing its priorities and initiatives.  Through policy implementation and cooperation with the stakeholders businesses and residents continue to reach agreement and consensus on residential development and imrovements.

Arlene Blundell

City Council should use this plan as an important tool in creating mid-term goals for the city as a whole.  It should be supported in every way, UNLESS any particular part is not in the best interests of the community as a whole.

Diane Brennan

By following the January 2011 implementation plan for short, medium, and long term actions.

By keeping a careful eye on the city’s budget to ensure funds available for implementation; and

By maintaining a reasonable relationship with the planning department and with the mayor and council.

Brunie Brunie

I have read your comprehensive community plan. As a councilor I would most certainly vote on all facets of green transportation.  My hot rod bike is the way I personally get around.  I love it and plan to never again own a car.  Another reason I can live within my means.  Safe cycling is the way of the future and I don’t mean share the road with the car.

I would encourage many more small business’s bringing more vibrancy and self sufficiency to your area. Growing organic local food big big time as the most important economic development is my no. one platform so grow grow grow!!!

Gord Fuller

Council must take active participation in working to implement all neighbourhood plans. It can do this through ongoing communication with neighbourhood groups and encouraging staff participation with these groups as well. Items in the plan are comprised of those the Neighbourhood can accomplish, those Neighbourhood and City work on together and those that are largely the responsibility of the City. Ongoing communication will be key to their implementation.

Ted Greves

The first way of supporting the Plan is to become informed about it and its Ten Guiding Principles. I know there is an extensive Implementation Strategy and as stated “The Strategy identifies actions, timing and responsibilities of the City….” So, if the City supports the Neighbourhood Plan it will encourage its implementation with its actions at the Committee and Council level.

Diana Johnstone

City Council must maintain open communication with SECA throughout the entire range of implementation from immediate to ongoing. Council, along with city planners should be supportive to help ensure that the projects in progress are moving forward as anticipated. They should always be mindful that the implementation is in line with the Official Community Plan and other community projects ensuring connectivity, and that consultation is ongoing.

Council members should take an active role in attending SECA meetings (when possible) and perhaps carry out an annual review with the neighbourhood to maintain interest, keep up to speed with accomplishments and be supportive of actions that still need to be identified.

Jim Kipp

Neighbourhood plans are the fundimental bases for our official community plan.  Supporting the visions of the community process by the development of policy using Bylay 4500 as an example.

Gary Korpan

I was the Mayor that got all our work in Plan Nanaimo actually adopted as Nanaimo’s Official Community Plan in 1993. It gave for the first time special significance to Neighbourhood Plans. I was particularly gratified to see the diligence and public participation your neighbourhood undertook in developing your Neighbourhood Plan. Council is to be guided by that component within the context of the whole bylaw. As always, elected officials must represent the greater good of the whole community over special or local interests if there is a conflict of direction or guidance.

Rodger Lomas

The ONP fits nicely and complimentary into the present global OCP. As we move into an inclusive Visioning process and formulation of the look, feel and flavour of the Nanaimo of the future that the people of Nanaimo want to see – then these plans ONP and OCP will be critical in the revision of each to reflect the Visioning outcomes and subsequent implementation plan, schedule and budgeting.

Zeni Maartman

The South End has been very proactive for a good number of years. The citizens have worked hard to build a better South End and we have! I will work with the South End, and support it’s implementation, within the guidelines of our OCP. Neighbourhood Associations play a vital role in our city. I would like to see all neighbourhoods throughout our city form associations, as the building blocks for our vision for the future. When I was a School Trustee, each trustee was assigned a set of schools to be the official Trustee Liason. We could have a similar program with Councillors.

Jeet Manhas

We spend enormous amount of time on our official Neighbourhood Community Plans. After they have been completed, at present we don’t have proper process to implement these plans.

We need to be more assertive in bringing these neighbourhood plans to be successful. When I am elected I want to work with neighhourhoods and city staff on setting a program to have these plans implemented.

Bill McKay

As I stated in the March by-election, it will be Council’s role to provide an environment that will be welcoming to private capital.  A small local developer who is building in our area, and who has dealt with many cities in past stated that Nanaimo is one of the WORST communities he has ever had to work with in an effort to move one of his projects forward.  We need to welcome investment, work with the neighbourhoods to ensure the type of development is appropriate, and move the projects along as quickly as possible.

Darcy Olsen

Communication between Council and Nanaimo neighbourhood associations, such as SECA, is key.  Nanaimo City Council needs to incorporate Neighbourhood Plans into the Official Community Plan so it has the full support it deserves.

Fred Pattje

It was a great source of satisfaction for me to have been able to help facilitate the South End’s Neighbourhood Plan. Our Official Community Plan speaks of these plans as ” building blocks of our municipal society” and I fully agree with that description. Council’s role in implementing this plan has many aspects and varies from assisting to maintain the character and livability of your neighbourhood to providing access to neighbourhood service levels to increasing housing choices and a host of other objectives in between………

Trent Snikkers

The South End Community Plan will be transformational.  I believe that neighbourhood plans form an integral part of the Official Community Plan.  It is not practical for any one City Councillor to fully grasp all the concerns of every neighbourhood and Neighbourhood Plans can facilitate the decision-making process for City Council.

As a city Councillor I would push to bring this Plan forward as expediently as possible to help the South End move ahead as a distinct community in Nanaimo.  The potential of the South End to become one of the most vibrant parts of Nanaimo is incredible.

Rob Zver

Council should work closely with the South End residents to assure that when they make decisions around land use it is within the communities desires and also enhances the vision of the city as a whole.

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2. Potential Park Space

2. The South End Community has a vision of creating parks space that is sadly lacking in the area. If elected how would you support and initiate the possible acquisition by the City of Nanaimo of either the properties at 901 & 925 Harbourview St. or 101 South St. for use as public parklands in the South End Neighbourhood?

Parks are vital for health, a sense of well-being in the community, air quality, and more. The city could do more to purchase properties, although finding the money is always an issue. Working with non-profits such as NALT (Nanaimo and Area Land Trust) and developers may help to stretch the funds. Community involvement in the actual creation of park-land once the property is secured would be a task SECA is up to! See Issue #4 at my website.

–Ian Gartshore

 

I calculate that the combined total of these properties is 25 acres. At $500K per acre that works out to about $6 Million per parcel. I would first investigate the communities ability to raise those funds, how they would propose to do so, and what kind of time frame we would have to work with.

–Bill McKay

I agree that the South End needs more parks space, especially on the waterfront. I would try to ensure that at least one of those properties is high on the priority list of potential park acquisitions identified by the Parks, Recreation, and Culture Commission.

–Darcy Olsen

Neighbourhood Associations should be given assistance to develop public-private and non-profit partnerships to derive the funding for such badly needed projects that don’t easily fit into every taxpayers priority list. SECA could be a model for this kind of initiative in Nanaimo.

–Brian Fillmore

I do agree that park space in the south end of Nanaimo is currently insufficient for a healthy community. I am not familiar with the properties that you list as possible public parklands, but if elected, I would certainly investigate any opportunity for their acquisition by the CON.

As you know it is often much more palatable for the rest of the taxpayers if the area closest to these parks could somehow raise a portion of the funds for such a purchase. I know that this would be difficult, but as a recent purchaser of the 2 houses on Crace Street I would be glad to help with any fundraising efforts.
–Murray McNab

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3. Wharf Lands

3. The Port Authority has recently built a cruise ship terminal on their wharf lands. What would your vision for the neighbourhood abutting this property be?  How will that impact our neighbourhood?

——————

As stated above, I now have a rather large vested interest in what happens with the new Cruise Ship Terminal and the surrounding area. I would love to see a complete makeover of the existing rail yard as has been proposed by the Railway Foundation. This could become a tourist attraction with possibly a working steam train running on existing tracks between Duncan and Parksville or beyond.

The current zoning allows for the densification of this area. This will lead to more local services and amenities. There are many great, hard working people living in this area and the views from this area are spectacular. This area is very close to downtown and it would take very little effort to promote the use of public transit, walking, bicycling, or other “green” modes of transport.

I worked down on Fry Street about 15 years ago and have been most impressed with the positive changes in the neighbourhood.
— Murray McNab

Many options abound. While recognising the need for industrial land and especially the fact that Nanaimo is a transportation hub city, how could the whole city work toward a comprehensive plan to better utilise that area?

It seems to me that a transportation hub may be one option, but only one that is attractive and draws people to this beautiful water-front area. I could see a year-round farmer’s market here, one that would be appreciated by locals, accessed by foot, bicycle, public transit, and by the tourists who wish to experience something unique. Affordable (not social) housing also comes to my mind.

— Ian Gartshore

The Cruise Terminal development opens up a world of possibilities for the South End. There is ample land there for many mixed uses, far beyond expanding the residential component of the South End. Entertainment, light industry, commercial, professional offices, even a high tech park highlighting green industries could be attracted to co-exist in a ‘village within a city’ enhancing the attractiveness of the existing South End as a revitalized, people-friendly part of the city to live.

Careful planning must be employed right away to make sure the opportunities to fashion this part of the South End in an enviable manner are not missed.
— Brian Fillmore

Cruise ship terminal and wharf lands: This question is quite complex. The wharf lands have the potential to become a major addition to downtown Nanaimo, with shops, offices, and residential (possibly fairly high density).

Much of the area is also a specified land claim of the Snuneymux First Nation, who will need to be consulted and who may become a participant in any development. And the Port Authority is of course a major player.

In my view, all planning for this area should be done publicly, in a transparent fashion, and should include the South End Residents Association. Whatever vision emerges will need to satisfy all parties and must pay close attention to the transition zone between new development and existing homes and businesses. If we do it right, the impact on the existing neighbourhood should be very positive and enriching.

–Darcy Olsen

I have not seen a long range strategy for the balance of the assembly wharf and adjacent property. I also understand that what we know as the CPR land is now for sale. If so, there may well be a requirement to move the rail lines from downtown.

If the Wilcox lands and the CPR property become part of a major redevelopment, why can’t we work with private developers to purchase from the E&N, the adjacent rail right of way with the mind to develop the waterfront portion in a manner that blends well with the South End ‘Master Plan’?

If marketed and executed properly, the entire south end of the assembly wharf area and the entire South End Community could be one of the hottest redevelopment areas in Canada. Why can’t we take some of the energy from places like Whalley, in Surrey, and create the same kind of excitement here?

I’m not suggesting a wholesale replacement of neighbourhood, but rather an integration of the old and new. Imagine redevelopment and enhancement with ‘people places’, extended sea wall, new waterfront shops, and perhaps a transportation terminus! Can I do this alone? Absolutely not, but with buy in from Council, staff, your community, and the rest of Nanaimo, why can’t we think big!
— Bill McKay

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While we’re waiting for their responses….

…check out these ones from the Nanaimo News Bullletin, which should be in their newspaper today.

Nice job!

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Candidate By-election Questions

Well, we’ve finalized the questions that we will be asking potential council candidates in the upcoming by-election on March 26. Here they are:

1.  The South End Community has a vision for Nicol Street outlined in their newly created Neighbourhood Plan.  If elected, what actions would you recommend to the city to transform Nicol Street from an outdated highway to a vibrant urban corridor?

2.  The South End Community has a vision of creating parks space that is sadly lacking in the area. If elected how would you support and initiate the possible acquisition by the City of Nanaimo of either the properties at 901 & 925 Harbourview St. or 101 South St. for use as public parklands in the South End Neighbourhood?

3.  The Port Authority has recently built a cruise ship terminal on their wharf lands. What would your vision for the neighbourhood abutting this property be?  How will that impact our neighbourhood?

4.  What are the ideas from the South End Neighbourhood Plan that are the most impressive to you and if elected how would you work towards their implementation?

Come back march 18…we’ll start posting responses then…!

 

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What is Plumping?

Does the thought of checking off 8 boxes for council candidates fill you with dread?  Did you know that you don’t have to select all 8?  Or that voting for less may actually be a good thing?

An interesting take on voting, snitched from Gord Fuller’s blog:

VOTING IN THE MUNICIPAL ELECTION

First-past-the-post system:

This is the system we use in Nanaimo for Municipal elections and refers to the basis on which votes are counted in order to determine who is elected. A first-past-the-post system is one where ballots are not valid unless they have been marked by the voter to indicate the candidate(s) that the voter wishes to have elected. No more candidates can be indicated than the number of vacancies to be filled.

Often voters think that because there are eight positions for City Council they need to pick eight names from the list of candidates. This is not true and can ultimately cause those you want to see elected to lose (see Plumping).

Counting of the Votes:

Where there are multiple council positions, 8 in Nanaimo, to be filled, the votes on each ballot are counted as being of equal value to each other. Even though a voter might have a distinct order of preference among the candidates there is no mechanism for such preferences to be shown on the ballot.

Candidates are elected consecutively according to who receives the largest number of votes. There is no pre-determined percentage of the overall vote required to be gained before a candidate is elected so a candidate can be elected with a very much smaller percentage of the vote than under any other electoral system.

Plumping:

Plumping allows voters to vote for fewer than the number of candidates to be elected. It permits voters to concentrate their voting power on those they support, rather than being constrained to also vote for those they oppose. Rather than voting for all eight council positions a voter can chose to vote for simply one, two or more if they wish.

Prepared by Gordon Fuller – October 3rd, 2008

Will YOU be plumping this election?

Click on the link below to poll (and compare) your responses.

 

Will you be plumping this election?
( surveys)

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